How does a sculpture morph?  As I stated in previous posts, sometimes I will create a 3D digital model to work out the design process. This lets my client and I change and modify sizes, placement, interaction and poses.  These digital models are done quickly usually using preexisting models that I can change to fit my needs.  The photographs on this blog post show the morphing of the March Hare.  For the monumental bronze sculpture of Move One Place On- a scene in Lewis Carroll’s book Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. rabbitt

 

I would continue to create the sculpture digitally, but sometimes I just like the feel of the clay.  So I then went back down to the traditional studio, my office is upstairs my studio is downstairs. Downstairs I worked on the March Hare, in clay. Besides making the monumental sculpture of this scene I will also be making a number of  table-top versions in bronze for sale. Sculpting downstairs in traditional clay and seeing things in a physical form helps me to see how this smaller version will work as well as the interaction of pieces in a physical world.   hare

 

Once I got something I was interested in, I brought the clay piece back upstairs and scanned him with a 3D scanner. I will need a digital model to enlarge him, but I also did not want to sculpt a tiny cup, saucer and watch traditionally.  I put these items into the model in the computer.  march hare

I love the action of this piece. Remember also that he is interacting with the visitor, that will be seated on a bench next to him.  You also remember that I mentioned in a previous post that I will be hiding things in the sculpture. When you see this sculpture be sure to check out the stump that he is sitting on. I am sure I will be hiding things there. I also have a bunch of other ideas for hidden objects in this piece of the March Hare.  I can’t wait to sculpt him life-size. As soon as the other figures are ready I will send the 3D files off for enlargements.  Stay tuned.

 


Bridgette Mongeon is a sculptor, writer, illustrator and educator as well as a public speaker.

Her blog can be found at http://www.creativesculpture.com.

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