No, you are not seeing things. That is a tiny 3D color
print of a man that was scanned at
Captured Dimensions in Plano, Texas.

Calling all artist and craft people in the Dallas, Texas area. I am thrilled to announce that I have been invited to give a lecture hosted by Captured Dimensions on Thursday, July 24th 2014 from 6:30-9:30 pm. The topic is, of course based on my upcoming book,“3D Technology in Fine Art and Craft: Exploration of 3D Printing, Scanning, Sculpting and Milling.”

If you are not familiar with Captured Dimensions then I would highly recommend you take a look at this video and their website. Captured Dimensions specializes in a scanning process called photogrammetry. It is basically taking photographs all around a subject and making them into a 3D model. I’m featuring a section on photogrammetry in the new book and will be scheduling my own sitting with my granddaughter as a model while visiting Dallas. How can the cameras “scan” a moving baby? Unlike 3D scanning with a scanner, photogrammetry at Captured Dimensions is done quickly with the click of a shutter. I will be featuring this sitting in the book as well as creating some works of art using these digital creations made in coordination with Captured Dimensions.

But this facility and the process of “scanning” sculpture offers so much more. Artwork can be created in one size and then repurposed and sold at another size. For example, monumental pieces can be made as jewelry. What does that mean? You can often make more money by repurposing art that you have already created. There is really so much that you can do using 3D technology, the best thing to do is to come and listen to the lecture and we can brainstorm.

Imagine full color images of your children, your bride,or your baby. On July 24th I’ll be talking about 3D technology in fine art and craft at Captured Dimensions in Plano, Texas. 

As a sculptor of 30 years I am embracing the new technologies as well as interviewing others and sharing my process though this book. There is so much that can be done with 3D printing, scanning, sculpting and milling. I keep saying to everyone,

“You don’t know what you can do until you know what you can do. When you hear some of the possibilities it will really blow your mind.”

I can’t wait to share. If you get a chance, come on by and get an ear full and learn about what can be done. After the lecture there will be a Q&A session. There will also be wine and hors d’oeuvres, as well as a tour of the studio. This is a chance for attendees to explore ways in which 3D technology could enhance their craft and increase exposure to their works of art.

Please join us in traveling the crossroads of 3D technology and sculptural art:

Location: Captured Dimensions Studio, 2805 E Plano Pkwy, Ste 250, Plano, TX 75074
Date: Thursday, July 24, 2014 from 6:30 – 9:30pm

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Bridgette Mongeon is a sculptor, writer, illustrator and educator as well as a public speaker.

Her blog can be found at https://creativesculpture.com.

She is the vice chair of the planning committee for 3DCAMP Houston 2012 and 2013http://www.3dcamphouston.com

Follow the artists on twitter twitter.com/Sculptorwriter

Follow me on Facebook

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Texas Country Reporter comes to my Houston, Texas art studio to film me working for a day.

I was very honored to have Texas Country Reporter visit my studio this week. With a career in sculpting that spans 30 years I have had press before, but this one was very special. The focus of this segment is on the sculpting of children. Though, of late, I have been sculpting huge mascots or artwork for colleges such as the Grambling Tiger, or the Prairie View panther, and “Called to Pray for Dallas Baptist University, the children have always had my heart. I have not had a child commission in a couple of years.While floating through the photographs of my artwork over the many years I realize how many of these children have come through my life.  I don’t worry about it. The children commissions will return, but I realize I miss them. The profound part of missing them is magnified by now having grandchildren.

Watching children play sparks my creativity. When they are my own grandchildren my inspiration is filled with overwhelming love.

I started sculpting years ago by being inspired by the fanciful nature of childhood exhibited in my own child, and now that spark is flamed again by the birth of my grandchildren.  I am so pleased that my granddaughter Issa could become a part of the segment. When I babysit her I watch her with a sculptor’s eye.  I long for the opportunity to capture those child gestures. It is the simple things, peeking under the bed walking on her tip toes or just toddling that inspire me. I have saved a picture of my other granddaughter Karina.  It is on my phone and I look at it often, one day you will see this scene played out in clay or bronze.

I have been very occupied with my other muse- writing. I have been writing a book 3D “Technology in Fine Art and Craft: Exploring 3D Printing, Sculpting, Scanning and Milling.”  The preparation for the photo shoot gave me a little break as I pulled out a personal sculpture of a baby Issa yawning, and got to work on it again.  It is interesting. I started by making children and

Watching baby Issa interact with her newborn image of her with a yawn. Looks like sticking her finger in her mouth was the great adventure.

selling them, I created the scenes I wanted and hoped I could make a living by doing so. Now, I balance the commissions and writing and have little time to do any “personal” pieces.

I am glad that the the Texas Country Reporter had the incentive to show not just my traditional process but the digital process as well.  From scanning of children, to the presentations that I create digitally in the computer.

Digital processes are becoming a regular part of my traditional sculpting. I use 3D scanners to scan art for enlargement, reduction and repurposing of the designs. I also combine 3D technology with traditional processes in my work. I’m thrilled to be writing the book “3D Technology in Fine Art and Craft: Exploration of 3D Printing, Scanning, Sculpting and Milling”

They asked me if there was anything I would have liked to do, but have yet to do?  I spoke about this next piece, and it is true that I am really excited about it, but I think I would also like to create a public scene with multiple children, and maybe their pets- dogs and kittens interacting with the children.

Still interaction with a sculpture is important and I’m thrilled that Texas Country Reporter might possibly show the next commission that I’m waiting to hear about this week . It is a life size sculpture. A happening, a place, a thing to experience.  One day soon, individuals will be able to go to a Texas park and have tea with the Mad Hatter, Alice, the door mouse, cheshire cat and the rabbit. I’m calling “Move one place on”  my magnum opus. I can’t wait until it is done and I can watch individuals interact with the sculpture.  That is my favorite thing about public art.

A digital quick sketch of the proposed sculpture “Move One Place On.” I am excited about this piece. I can’t reveal the name of the park until later, but it is a Texas Park. Come have lunch with the Mad Hatter and his gang, as these folks are doing in the scene.

The Texas Country Reporter segment does not air until October. Many have asked what channel?  I found this showtime schedule on their website. They also said they put some of the segments on their you tube station.  I do hope they do it with this one.  I have no idea what will end up on the cutting room floor. I just know that these guys were so entertaining and fun to work with.  Maybe by October I’ll have permission to name the park that ” Move one place on” piece will be going into. And they can air that.  The park is expected to open next summer.

Ah, and Bob Phillips was so tricky in getting me to talk about something that I rarely talk about in public. No, I won’t mention it here, I’ll just post this photograph taken by a very sensitive photographer Georgina Langoria several years ago.

Houston, Texas Artist sculpts the deceased.
A passionate photograph, that depicts a
bit more about the “personal” side.
By photographer Georgina Langoria

To wrap this up, here is a segment done at the very beginning of my career. Channel 8 won best artists documentary for the segment.  Just look at that young lady, in my first very old studio.  It will be interesting to watch each of these two segments in contrast.

Follow me on twitter, and I’ll be sure to post when the segment will air.

Thanks again Texas Country Reporter.

____________________________________________

Bridgette Mongeon is a sculptor, writer, illustrator and educator as well as a public speaker.

Her blog can be found at https://creativesculpture.com.

She is the vice chair of the planning committee for 3DCAMP Houston 2012 and 2013http://www.3dcamphouston.com

Follow the artists on twitter twitter.com/Sculptorwriter

Follow me on Facebook

Listen to the Art and Technology Podcast

Sculptor Bridgette Mongeon is the host of Art and Technology podcast
Art and Technology
podcast- A fireside
chat where art and
technology meet

We are looking for a special guest for this podcast—

The theme of the podcasts—
“A Fireside Chat Where Art and Technology Meet.”

Host Bridgette Mongeon, is reviving The Art and Technology Podcasts. The spark of the regeneration of the podcasts is due to the many inspiring guests that are featured in the hosts soon to be released book, 3D Technology in Fine Art and Craft.

“The artists and vendors featured in the book “3D Technology in Fine Art and Craft” are some of the finest artists in the field. They are gracious enough to share their tips/tricks, software and vendors. This makes the book a valuable tool for all artists. The work featured is truly inspiring. It is impossible to put all of the suggestions of the artists into the book. The podcasts give the reading audience additional information, while also giving the reader/listener an opportunity to sit in on a more intimate conversation with many of the people featured,”
States author and podcast host Bridgette Mongeon

Podcasting with Bridgette Mongeon

The author/and host is still looking for artists and vendors who are doing unusual and creative things with 3D technology to feature on both podcasts and in the book, but more than that, there is an immediate need for the first guest for the re-introductory podcasts.

The specifics needed for this first special guest is a guest with a 3D technology website, magazine or blog that has a following and can change things up a bit with a dual interview. In this first podcast, the host will interview the magazine and the magazine will interview the author/host concerning the up and coming book. If you have a publication or you know of a publication that might be interested, please contact the author directly.

We are trying to fill this spot and recorded this podcast before the 6th of April or sooner.

ABOUT THE PODCASTS
The podcasts were originally created in 2010 by host Bridgette Mongeon in conjunction with her last book Digital Sculpting in Mudbox: Essential Tools and Techniques for artists. The Mudbox book was one of the first books to include information on 3D printing, scanning and milling for artists. The podcasts also rounded out her thesis as she completed her MFA in the merging of the fine art studio and 3D technology.

Give a listen to the old podcasts-

Podcast Guests from the Previous Art and Technology Podcasts-2010

  • Authors, Mike de la Flor and Bridgette Mongeon speak about Digital Sculpting in Mudbox book Listen from browser
  • Robert Michael Smith- pioneer in technology and CNC stone carver Listen from browser
  • Joris Debo- talks about advances at Materialise .MGX Listen from browser
  • Kevin Gillespie talks his own experiences with copyright and 3D technology Listen from browser
  • Digital Scanning with Next Engine Scanner Dan Gustafson Listen from browser
  • 3D printing of skin and fine art? Interview with the director of SymbioticA Listen from browser

Podcast Guests For New Podcasts Coming -2014

  • Introductory Podcast – YOUR COMPANY HERE-
  • Joshua Harker- 3d Printing of fine art, kickstarter and more
  • Bathsheba Grossman- pioneer in 3D printing of art, 3D printing in metal and math in art
  • 3D Printing of Jewelry with Lisa Kirkawa
  • Experiments in 3D printing fused deposition modeling and investment casting
  • MCor technology pushing the limits with 3D printing of paper, in full color
  • Artists and Digital Stone Project spokesperson Jon Isherwood talks about 3D,  and CNC Milling
  • Eric Van Straaten talks about 3D printing in color and fine art

There are many, many more scheduled recordings.

About the Author’s new book

3D Technology in Fine Art and Craft.

The audience for the book is both fine artists and graphic artists. Besides the inspiration, the book helps the reader navigate through the tools, processes and vendors in 3D technology. They can then realize their art in the physical world. The book features many different artists their work and inspiration as well as chapters on 3D printing, CNC milling, 3D scanning, modeling and sculpting, copyrights and more. The artists share what they do, how they make their art and why, and where to find their resources. The book makes the transition of incorporating the technology with the traditional craft less daunting and quite a bit of fun.

The Digital Details for The Podcasts
The podcasts, once posted, are public. The links to these incredible conversations can be used on any website, blogs and easily be shared with others. Each interviewee will receive the links to their podcasts to use however they like. If you have a blog, website,  3D magazine, or Facebook page you are welcome to us them as free content for your publication. Subscribe to the podcasts in iTunes and you will know when one is available.

The podcasts, once published, will continue to appear at digitalsculpting.net. They will also be on the new books website- to be announced, and can be found in iTunes and through the authors Facebook page as well as through the authors twitter feed.

SPONSORS
If your company would like to sponsor the Art and Technology podcasts please  contact the podcast host directly. This is a great opportunity for vendors and service bureaus. Also available are sponsorship opportunities on the books accompanying website.

_______________________________________________

Bridgette Mongeon is a sculptor, writer, illustrator and educator as well as a public speaker.

Her blog can be found at https://creativesculpture.com.

She is the vice chair of the planning committee for 3DCAMP Houston 2012 and 2013 http://www.3dcamphouston.com

Follow the artists on twitter twitter.com/Sculptorwriter

Follow me on Facebook

Listen to the Art and Technology Podcast

Leonor Caraballo and Abou Farman take MRI’s of Leonaor’s breast tumor and create a digital model that is then turned into a 3D print. Eventually this cancer turns into a bronze jewel. When viewing the artwork at an art show a doctor states, “these tumors are saying something.” Could this art have turned into a research project? A great example of how art can show something that otherwise might have gone unnoticed. If this is not STEAM in action I don’t know what is. ( STEAM the educational initiative of combining science, technology, engineering art and math.)

_______________________________________________

Bridgette Mongeon is a sculptor, writer, illustrator and educator as well as a public speaker.

Her blog can be found at https://creativesculpture.com.

She is the vice chair of the planning committee for 3DCAMP Houston 2012 and 2013 http://www.3dcamphouston.com

Follow the artists on twitter twitter.com/Sculptorwriter

Follow me on Facebook

Listen to the Art and Technology Podcast

You never know when you will inspire someone with your story.

Yesterday I spoke to a group of 12-14 year old girls at a conference called Expanding Your Horizons in Science and Math. So, why is an artist speaking at this type of conference? Well, as many of you know, we now use many technological tools, such as 3D sculpting, 3D Scanning, 3D printing and CNC milling in my studio. Studying the interaction of technology in the traditional sculpting studio was the focus of my graduate work a few years back. I have been writing on it since 2007, and I am now finishing up a book titled 3D Technology in Fine Art and Craft.

While I was at 3D Printing World Expo speaking I was introduced to a girl who was showing a poster at the conference. Coco told about how she was given a 3D printing kit and put it together documenting her experience. I suppose Coco, reminds me of myself. At 12, I was asked to participate in a conference and had my first speaking engagement. I had no idea what “speaking” meant, other than what I did in every day life. “Just tell your story.” Someone said. Well, I have always been good at that. The most profound thing for me was when a young girl came up to me and said, “ Thank you, I know if you could make it through that difficult experience, I can also do it.” I was hooked, I was giving someone hope and inspiring someone. With my many achievements in life, inspiring and giving hope is what I consider my highest calling. You see, I was not speaking about technology all those years ago. I was telling my story about growing up with a mom who was an alcoholic and was, at the time, recovering from this horrible addiction. I spoke about the dynamics of a family suffering from addiction and what I have learned about myself in the process. The story was heart breaking, but it must have been hopeful. Today, I have no idea who that other young girl was that said those words to me so long ago, but it is the reason why I love public speaking.

Don’t wait to grow up. Be a tech girl now!

When I see Coco, I see a young lady with a spirit, drive, and fortitude. I see someone who is willing to put her story out there. It may not be a story about surviving addiction, but it is just as important. It is empowering. It is saying to young girls, as I said in my lecture at Expanding Your Horizons, “You don’t have to wait to grow up to discover, and explore these things that inspire you; you can do them now. And if you do, you will have an advantage over those who wait.” I wish young people could understand the advantages that they can have, just because they are kids and doing “special” things. For example, a 13 year old writing a good novel will certainly have an advantage at getting published, because well.. they are 13 and doing this profound thing. If that same 13 year old waited until they were, 21 then they are grouped with the rest of the 21 year olds. There is no harm in standing out. You can tell your story and inspire others.

I wanted to videotape Coco so that the girls could see, first hand, that I didn’t make her up. Who knows if Coco and I inspired just one young girl to push herself a bit more. Maybe, by our appearance and encouragement, we gave them “permission” to be all they could be. Maybe one girl will go on to invent something important, but more importantly we may have given her the opportunity to have a more fulfilling life and purpose.

Thanks Coco for being… you. Thanks for sharing with me and for giving me permission to share with the girls. If ever you need a mentor or someone to look up to, I would be honored to help. Keep doing what you are doing.

If you would like to know more about Coco, check out her blog. Yes, this young lady has a blog, and she reviews products. Hey, tech companies, you really should send Coco things for her to review. ( Coco, offer your services for this. Lets talk about this further.)

I’m going to add my list of resources that I passed out to the girls at Expanding Your Horizons. Free software, and other such things are important for anyone wanting to explore and needing to do so without a paycheck.


Sculptor Bridgette Mongeon www.creativesculpture.com

Bridgette Mongeon’s Books
Digital Sculpting With Mudbox: Essential Tools and Techniques for Artists.
3D Technology in Fine Art and Craft Coming 2014/2015

Coco- Very Happy Robot http://www.veryhappyrobot.com/about

Free software and apps for tinkering in 3D technology
Blender http://www.blender.org/
123D Catch and other apps http://www.123dapp.com/

Free sculpting software
Sculptris http://pixologic.com/sculptris/

Where can I get something 3D printed? These websites let you 3D print, also check these web sites for programs.

Shapeways http://www.shapeways.com/ – look at their Make + Sell tab for easy free creator apps.
Sculpteo http://www.sculpteo.com/en/
i.materailse http://i.materialise.com/ – look at the creations corner tab for free apps

3D printers to make
Coco’s printer http://deezmaker.com/
http://reprap.org/wiki/RepRap

3D printer to buy
Maker bot https://www.makerbot.com/
Cubify http://www.cubify.com

Free poser software
http://www.daz3d.com/

Where to learn about 3D printing, scanning etc.
http://txrxlabs.org

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This is why I am wiring the book 3D Technology in Fine Art and Craft. Companies- take note. Collaborate  with artists and watch what they can do.  I think it will make it worth your while.  I love the quote in this article-

“Because he’s an artist, he’s pushing the envelope further than an industry would,” says Autodesk director Maurice Conti, who first grew interested in Laarman’s work a few year’s back when the designer was using a large scale resin printer. “An artist just has a creative vision and they kind of ignore what the tools are supposed to be able to do and they realize their creative vision.”


_______________________________________________

Bridgette Mongeon is a sculptor, writer, illustrator and educator as well as a public speaker.

Her blog can be found at https://creativesculpture.com.

She is the vice chair of the planning committee for 3DCAMP Houston 2012 and 2013 http://www.3dcamphouston.com

Follow the artists on twitter twitter.com/Sculptorwriter

Follow me on Facebook

Listen to the Art and Technology Podcast

 

I’m looking for about 3 volunteers, women,  with I pads that can help at a young women’s conference titled Expanding Your Horizons in Science and Mathematics. This conference is for junior high girls.

You would be downloading 123D catch and working with a group of girls to scan a couple of things during the two presentations. The date is February 22nd. There are two sessions beginning just after lunch, each about 50 minutes long.  We will not be scanning the entire time. There will be a general introduction to 3D technology and the last part we will be scanning.  If you are interested, please contact me ASAP. I want to meet everyone before hand, will do something fun at my studio- say Wed.  evening of next week.  At that time we can get to know one another and be sure we all know the software.

I’m curious about post processing in 3D printing. Excited to know about plating and wondering how I can use the two technologies on some of my precious artwork. Can I get the feel I like as in this traditional sculpture?  Will I be able to push the limits of the new technology to find my own look? How does texture play with the materials.  I’m looking forward to sharing the process with others.

I’m looking for artists who are using 3D technology to print objects and then doing something unusual with the post processing. Post processing basically means the process after the 3D print is complete. Are you painting with a special process? Are you using chemicals, sanding etc. Or are you a company like RePliForm offering a service such as plating as a post process. This is for a book chapter in the new book I am writing titled 3D Technology in Fine Art and Craft. Please send links with photographs if you have them. You can post them to this blog post or on my facebook page.
_______________________________________________

Bridgette Mongeon is a sculptor, writer, illustrator and educator as well as a public speaker.

Her blog can be found at https://creativesculpture.com.

She is the vice chair of the planning committee for 3DCAMP Houston 2012 and 2013 http://www.3dcamphouston.com

Follow the artists on twitter twitter.com/Sculptorwriter

Follow me on Facebook

Listen to the Art and Technology Podcast

3D Printed Tiger

As I walk this road with the technology, I explore ways to make it fit into my work flow as a traditional artist. There always seems to be something lacking in my process of combining these two. At times this is very frustrating. At one point all the CG artists were shouting, “Try Zbrush and Mudbox it is just like sculpting.” It was indeed very similar to sculpting, but when I am sculpting if I push and pull on clay it does not ruin my armature. Back then, a thing called “retopologizing” seemed to be the holy grail- at least for my process. Retoplogizing simply meant taking the underlying mesh and recreating it to be even, wonderful, sculptable quads. I wanted the process to be as simple as pushing a button. Now,  the technology has advanced and at this date and time, retoplogozing is as easy as pushing a button while using Zbrush. I hate having to wait for the technology to catch up with my needs. I cringe when I hear someone say, well if you just use ____ program you could do that. You see,  I resisted having to learn, yet another program and spend countless hours doing something that did not feel “just like sculpting.”

Entering the 3D printing world I have had similar problems with preparing models for printing in 3D. In February 2014  I was asked to lecture at 3D printing World Expo. While there I heard the key note speaker Cydni Tetro, founder and Chief Executive Officer of 3DPlusMe and adviser to Disney on technology commercialization, remind everyone that though 3D printing is cool, it is not easy. I demonstrated this same thing the next day in my lecture.

Concerning preparing your files for 3D printing— I’m waiting for the ease of the technology to catch up to my needs. A case in point is the tiger model created for Grambling State Louisiana. I created this sculpture for Grambling and really wanted to see it printed out as a 3D print. I had to modify the design, which I won’t go into right now, I’ll just say, what works for a 15 foot sculpture does not always translate into a small model.

An 8″  3D print of this sculpture was printed by 3d Rapid Prototyping using a projet 660. At the size shown I am told the costs is about $500. to print. The high cost of this is because it is solid.  Hollowing it out or making a shell of it will make it much cheaper to print.  However, this process of hollowing out is not as easy as it could be. Well, it is not as simple as pressing a the button.   How incredibly excited I was when Rasmus Koch Hansen from the ZBrush forum on Linked in  sent this video created by SteveTalkowski my way. I have yet to try hollowing the sculpture out. I do expect to attempt to hollow the tiger out as soon as possible as I would really like to document the book that I am writing “3D technology in Fine Art and Craft.”  I’ll report back later on this progress.

 

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Bridgette Mongeon is a sculptor, writer, illustrator and educator as well as a public speaker.

Her blog can be found at https://creativesculpture.com.

She is the vice chair of the planning committee for 3DCAMP Houston 2012 and 2013 http://www.3dcamphouston.com

Follow the artists on twitter twitter.com/Sculptorwriter

Follow me on Facebook

Listen to the Art and Technology Podcast